Tag Archives: stevenage physio

A useful exercise for “Tennis Elbow”

If you do have “tennis elbow” part of your recovery will be exercises to strengthen the muscles which have been injured.

One of these exercises which could help before you seek treatment is eccentric wrist extension…don’t worry we will show you what this is!!

Here is a link to a video (we think it’s Spanish!) it shows you exactly how to do the exercise.

“Tennis Elbow” exercise video

I would recommend 3 sets of 12, every other day using a light weight or resistance band. You may experience mild discomfort, but the exercise shouldn’t worsen your elbow pain. If it does, stop doing the exercise and call us for a consultation.

For an assessment, diagnosis and treatment of your elbow pain, please call us to book in for a consultation with one of our physiotherapists – 01438 317037.

Kerri Surman – Specialist Sports and Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist

Anatomy of “Tennis Elbow”

Tennis elbow affects the outer aspect of the elbow joint, with the pain feeling like it’s on the bone. Pain can radiate down into the forearm and sometimes into the hand.

The tissues causing the pain are usually the tendons of the forearm extensor muscles, most commonly the Extensor Carpi Radialis Brevis – this is a muscle which helps to stabilise the wrist when the elbow is straight or almost straight. This is why people get pain when they reach out and pick something up – the muscle is doing two jobs at once and it is struggling.

When the muscle has been overworked the tendon at the elbow becomes inflamed and painful. If properly rested in the initial stages of the injury it can settle down but if not, it becomes a chronic condition which can be tricky to get rid of without proper treatment. The muscles become very tight and sore and the elbow gets more painful.

If you think you have tennis elbow or any other ache or pain, please don’t leave it – call us on 01438 317037 to arrange a consultation with one of our physiotherapists who will assess you, provide you with a diagnosis and give you some treatment and advice.

Kerri Surman – Specialist Sports and Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist

Treatment for a Sprained Ankle

There are quite a few things your physiotherapist can do to help with your ankle sprain. At first, we need to reduce your pain and swelling.

One method we have at our clinic to help with this process is called interferential. This is a type of electrotherapy which sends small electrical impulses into the tissues to stimulate healing, blood flow and reduce pain by encouraging your body to release endorphins.

If you’ve heard of a TENS machine it’s basically a supersized one of those which physiotherapists are qualified to administer. Usually after 15-20 minutes on this machine your ankle will feel much less painful which will improve your walking and will make it easier to do your rehab which your physiotherapist will also provide you with.

If you need treatment for a sprained ankle, or any other injury we can usually see you within 48 hours of you calling us. So please give us a ring on 01438 317037 or message us through our Facebook page.

Kerri Surman – Specialist Sports and Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist

Exercise for an Ankle Sprain

We’ve discussed how damage to the ligaments and muscles causes the ankle to feel weak and unstable which leads to more twisted ankles. So how do we make it stronger and prevent future sprains?

Banded ankle eversion is a really simple but effective exercise to strengthen the peroneal muscles – if these muscles are strong, they will help keep your ankle in a straight line when you’re walking on uneven ground and reduce the chances of you spraining it again.

All you need is a stretchy band, also called resistance bands or resistance tubing. Place the middle of the band around the little toe of your injured ankle and pull the ends towards the good foot, hook the band under your good foot to create an anchor point for the band, then you’re ready. Slowly pull your injured foot outwards, stretching the band as you do. Hold for 2 seconds and then slowly bring the foot back to the middle. Repeat 15-20 times, rest for 1 minute and repeat again 3 or 4 times. Every few days try to increase your reps.

If you have worsening ankle pain, you should stop the exercise but all you should feel is an ache to the outside of your shin.

If you need this exercise progressing and more exercises to make sure your ankle heals fully please give us a call to arrange an appointment on 01438 317037 or message us through our Facebook page.

Kerri Surman – Specialist Sports and Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist

Anatomy of an Ankle Sprain

The most commonly injured structures when we twist our ankle are the ligaments on the outside of the ankle and the peroneal muscles at the side of the lower leg.

There are 3 main ligaments on the outside of the ankle, they all have quite long names so we will just call them ATFL, CFL and PTFL. Usually the ATFL gets injured, sometimes the CFL also gets injured and in the most serious ankles sprains the PTFL also gets damaged. The ligaments help to attach bones of the foot to the fibula part of the ankle joint. They also send information to the brain about how balanced we are. If they get damaged, they can be weakened and so give less stability and could send less signals to the brain causing the ankle to feel less balanced. This means that you could suffer more sprains to the same ankle.

The peroneal muscles are on the side of the ankle and lower leg. These muscles pull the foot outwards and stop it from rolling inwards. When we twist our ankle and the foot is forced inwards this can cause a strain of the Peroneals. If the ankle doesn’t get the correct treatment and you aren’t advised on the correct exercises, this strain can add to the weakness and lack of stability of the ankle.

If you sprain your ankle please give us a ring and book an appointment – it will save you pain, money, time and hassle if you do it early.

Speak to our friendly team on 01438 317037 or message us through our Facebook page.

Kerri Surman – Specialist Sports and Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist

Injury Topic of the Month – Ankle Sprain

Who hasn’t sprained an ankle at some time in their life? 

It must be the most commonly suffered injury. We see quite a few in our clinic which is a good thing for those who come to seek out physio advice, because most people just let it heal on its own and this usually leads to weakness, instability and sometimes ongoing pain. With this injury you are much better off seeing a physio once or twice early on, rather than ten or twelve times when you’ve been suffering for 6 months.

There are 2 main types of ankle sprain – medial and lateral – which basically means you either turned your foot inwards or outwards. The most common is when your foot goes inwards, and you end up with pain on the outside of your ankle.

This injury cause pain, swelling, bruising, stiffness, it makes us hobble around and can therefore cause knee pain, hip pain and back pain. A lateral ankle sprain is generally damage to one or more of the ligaments on the outside of the foot and ankle and a strain to the muscles, but it could also cause fractures to the fibula or the 5thmetatarsal. If you genuinely cannot put weight on your foot after you twist your ankle you need to go to A&E, but if you can put even a little weight on it you don’t, and you should see a physiotherapist.

We can usually see you within 48 hours of you ringing us – during these 48 hours you should ice and elevate your foot to help with the swelling and pain.

You can call to arrange an appointment on 01438 317037 or message us via our Facebook page.

Kerri Surman – Specialist Sports and Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist

Exercise for Anterior Knee Pain

Usually when someone has anterior knee pain, they also have very stiff quadricep muscles. This is the name of the group of muscles at the front of your thigh. As you have seen from the previous post the knee cap sits within the tendon of these muscles. This means that the quadriceps directly affect the knee cap and the front of the knee.

A simple solution for this problem is to work on this stiffness. You can do this in a couple of ways – foam rolling and stretching.

Here is a great stretch for the quadriceps. Pull your heel towards your buttock, keep your knees together and squeeze your glutes tucking your pelvis under (flattening the arch in your lower back).

Hold the stretch for 30-60 seconds and do at least 5 every day. If you have time to do more then you should – the more stretching you do the better the muscles will feel and the more effect you will have on the function of your knee.

If you have more knee pain due to this stretch, then stop and seek a physiotherapists opinion. We can usually see you within 48 hours of you calling us – so give us a ring and book in on 01438 317037.

Kerri Surman – Specialist Sports and Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist